God Among Us

In the beginning:

IMG_2950

When asked me to write an artist statement for the sculpture, I said yes without blinking an eye.  My understanding was, I would go through the genesis of the sculpture in explaining the experience of my journey while carving the flesh of the wood.  

The reality we foresee this day is difficult to explain because the work is based on a strong feeling of faith.  From the conception to the finished artwork, I tried to capture a moment in its eternity.  The  artist in me created something that she does not fully comprehend.  The sculpture is the fruit of the changing seasons of my roots from soils of many cultures.  It is also a strong belief in the divine rather than a proof in itself.  I am just an instrument in His hands.  This being said, I consider it is more important for the artwork to speak for itself without intervention or explanation. 

Ideally, a two-way avenue of communication flows between the Creator and the viewer allowing his mind to wander in prayer.  The visible is something different for everyone.  While my explanation can be useful to the viewer for exploration and consideration, it can also limit or constrict the possible responses.   

Progress:

IMG_0014

Completion:

God Among Us

Photo courtesy of Matt Chase Photography

Unveiling:

Unveiling Ceremony 1

 

A Sculptural Prayer

Do not gaze at it

But sink into it through your eyes, and

Feel its intensity under your skin.

Do not just think about it, instead,

Meditate on it 

Let it carry you to the unknown

Fast, Far and Forever

To a whole universe …

To embrace the glory of creation and

The Creator

Claude Parsons Memorial Award

Mandela-Nelle (Bronze) Earns

The Claude Parsons Memorial Award

The American Artists Professional League

86th  Grand National Exhibition

Salmagundi Club, New York City

 Jury of Awards:

Claudia Seymour (Internationally known Master still life painter in oil and pastel, President Emeritus of the Salmagundi Club, NYC)

Elizabeth Spencer (Award winning Resident Artist.  Member of the Salmagundi Club.  Life member of the Art Students League.)

Photos (3) The original, “Metal Check” and Bronze
Mandela-Nelle Original: Pecan

Mandela-Nelle Original: Pecan

Mandela-Belle during "metal Check" and before patina.   Location: Deep in the Heart Foundry, Bastrop, TX

Mandela-Belle during “metal check” and before patina
Location: Deep in the Heart Foundry, Bastrop, TX

Bronze

Bronze

 

Mandela-Nelle’s New York City Debut

The American Artists Professional League

86th  Grand National Exhibition

Salmagundi Club

Bronze H20" W7" D10"

Bronze
H20″ W7″ D10″

Address: Forty-Seven Fifth Avenue, New York, 10003
Show dates: Monday, November 10 – Friday, November 21, 2014
Announcements of Awards: Sunday, November 16, 2014

The American Artists Professional League

National Art Exhibition:

In its ongoing effort to promote and encourage artists specializing in realistic art forms, the AAPL has staged a Grand National Exhibition for over 83 years. Each year, hundreds of applicants from all 50 states in all media submit their work for review by a selection committee consisting of professional artists in the fields of oil, watermedia, pastel and graphics and sculpture.

History:

In January 1928, F. Ballard Williams, Assistant Treasurer of the National Academy of Design in New York, called a meeting of fifteen members of the Salmagundi Club. The purpose: to discuss the need for a national organization to meet the increasing interests in traditional realism in American art. Most attending were prominent academicians of their day. The attendees all agreed that an organization designed to protect artists’ interests and promote traditional American art was necessary and The American Artists Professional League (AAPL) was born.

The Salmagundi Club

About:

Founded in 1871, the Salmagundi Club is one of the oldest art organizations in the United States. Housed in an historic brownstone mansion in Greenwich Village, New York City, the Club offers programs including art classes, exhibitions, painting demonstrations, and art auctions throughout the year for members and the general public.

The Club owns a collection of over 1,500 works of art spanning its 140 year history and has a membership of nearly 850 artists and patrons. Its members have included important American artists such as Thomas Moran, William Merritt Chase, Louis Comfort Tiffany, N.C. Wyeth and Childe Hassam. Today the Club builds on this legacy by providing a center for the resurgence of representational art in America.

The Salmagundi facilities include three galleries, a library, an elegant period parlor, and a restaurant and bar with vintage pool tables.

The Little Prince Selected for Georgetown Competition

The Little Prince and the 2014 Art Hop

Georgetown, TX

October 3 – October 30, 2014

The 2014 Art Hop:

The 2014 Art Hop is a statewide juried art exhibit, organized by Georgetown Art Works.  The Art Hop is held in 5 different venues in downtown Georgetown, TX that are within 5 minutes walking distance from one another.

The Little Prince will be on exhibit:

The Georgetown Art Center

816 South Main Street

October 3 – October 30, 2014

Sunday: 1:00 to 5:00 PM

Monday: Closed

Tuesday to Saturday: 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM

Artist Reception and Awards:

Saturday, October 11 from 2:00 PM to 5:00 PM

The Georgetown Art Center

Georgetown Venues to view the work of artists from 57 cities from around Texas:

The Georgetown Art Center- 816 South Main Street

Artisans Connect Gallery- 122 East 8th Street

Cianfranni Coffee Company- 109 West 7th Street

The Georgetown Public Library- 402 West 8th Street

Red Poppy Coffee Company- (Inside the Public Library); 402 West 8th Street

The Georgetown Art Center:

Georgetown Art Works and the City of Georgetown have partnered to transform Fire Station One in historic downtown Georgetown in the Georgetown Art Center.  The art center provides a welcoming environment for visitors to view, appreciate, create and purchase art.  There is a gift shop.

The Little Prince

The Little Prince

Marika at the Coleman Theatre

A Entrance to Miami IMG_8227

Entrance to downtown Miami, OK

Coleman Theatre Historical Marker

Coleman Theatre Historical Marker

The Coleman Theatre- exterior

The Coleman Theatre- exterior

The Vaudeville Stage

The Vaudeville Stage

The Mighty Wurlitzer Organ

The Mighty Wurlitzer Organ

E Coleman Interior IMG_8169

The Exhibit

The Exhibit

Mandela-Nelle

Mandela-Nelle

Presentation

Presentation

Excerpt from Presentation

Well, this is about inspiration, creativity, and vision; not my inspiration, creativity, and vision but that of Ms. Darcie Shultz, the Interim Manager of the Coleman Theatre.  Because of her passion for the arts, she is allowing the lines of the visual and performing arts to intersect, merge, and form an artistic  connection.  This is about community.  George Coleman built this magnificent theatre for his community.  Darcie Shultz asked for a sculpture exhibit so that her community could have a visual arts experience in the home of the performing arts.  Ms. Shultz thank you for your kindness and thoughtfulness.

Creativity and community fascinate me.  We imagine creativity happens in a vacuum to a select few.  This is not the case. Inspiration, creativity, and vision, happen in community.  Look closely at the Coleman Theatre Beautiful.  I love how they included the word beautiful in the name.  This is a place of beauty and delight.    The architecture is Spanish Revival, the interior design is Louis XV and the organ is a Wurlitzer.  What we see is the vision of a man who dug water wells for a living and the vision of a community who brought back a decaying building to its former glory.           

Presentation to Upward Bound Students

Presentation to Upward Bound Students

Excerpt from Presentation

One is saying, money is not inspiring; another, creativity comes out of problems, and the third, we need a quest.  So, where does this leave us?  George Coleman built this theatre in a small town on Route 66 halfway between New York City and Los Angles.  

  • Did he find inspiration in money?  
  • Did the building rise up because of a problem or limitation? 
  • Was there a quest?  

George Coleman and his brother made a fortune when they discovered lead and zinc north of town.  Money allowed George to travel and enjoy vaudeville with its variety of entertainment: singing, dancing, comedy, juggling, and one-act plays.  Mr. Coleman had a passion for vaudeville.  They say it was his first love.  I believe, it was this passion for vaudeville that aroused his inspiration to address a problem, a limitation.  His workers and the people of the town could not easily experience vaudeville in 1929.  His quest was  to bring high-calibre acts to a world-class theatre in Miami.

P Presentation Upward Bound Students IMG_8118

 

 

Excerpt from Presentation

Time was allowed to take its toll on the theatre.  The building structure fell into a state of disrepair.  The original furnishings were gone, including the chandeliers and the Mighty Wurlitzer.  Decay.  Faith.  Yes, there were those in the community with the vision of a restored Coleman Theatre Beautiful as the center of the community.  

Miami’s Administrative Assistant, Sue Valliere had the vision to search for the lost Wurlitzer organ.  After it was found, volunteers expended great time and energy in reconstructing it.  There are many stories about what it took to bring second life to the theatre: reconstructing the chandeliers, finding the stained-glass medallions in such places as at garage sale and at a Tulsa restaurant, and the fund-raising effort of a “seat adoption” program.  As Barbara Smith of The Friends of the Coleman said, “This journey has been one of faith.”  And, may I add, it took a self-respecting community with a passion for excellence to undertake the quest.

Entrance to Miami, OK

Entrance to Miami, OK

 

The Coleman Theatre- Carving Passion

Theatre Poster

Theatre Poster

 Carving Passion

Miami News Record

Miami, OK

By: Jessica Graham jessica.graham@maiminewsrecord.com | Posted: Thursday, June 26, 2014

MIAMI — Coleman Theater books bus tours to see Haitian wood sculptor.

Marika Bordes, from Seguin, Texas, brought 14 of her artistic wood carving pieces, which have been displayed in the grand ballroom on the top floor of the Coleman theater all week.

“It is an honor to have my art displayed in Miami,” Bordes said. “I am very happy to be here.”

Managing Director Darcie Shultz said when looking for artists to bring to Miami, Bordes stood out among the others.

Shultz said the Mid-America Arts Alliance website directed her to five state agencies which had rosters of artists who had been selected to represent their state for touring. The alliance provides grant support for programs like this one.

“So I went to the Texas Arts Council website and I went through almost every single artist in every genre and Marika just stood out to me,” Shultz said. “I thought, ‘this is really interesting.’”

She said she felt the walk-through gallery — displaying Bordes’ art — would add to the experience of the daily tours.

“I am excited to be here (at the Coleman Theater),” Marley Kuckhahn from Minnesota said. “The art is beautiful work.”

The Coleman Theater was one of the stops for a bus tour from Minnesota on its way to a mission convention in Dallas.

Bordes was born in Haiti and raised in Montreal, Canada. She said 17-years ago she met her mentor Francois Sanon, a Haitian artist, who works in the Afro-Caribbean tradition. Sanon, she said, helped her realize she had talent.

“My mentor saw it (talent) and I did not see it myself,” Bordes said. “You know when someone tells you that you are talented you don’t believe it.”

She said she gets her inspiration from daily living. One particular piece called “Carousel of Woman” represents the life of woman. She explained the piece in detail of how she carved each woman on a raft.

“The piece begins from youth and how the girl is thinking about her dresses,” Bordes said. “Then she jumps to motherhood where her world is devoted to kids and after one point in life some goes to religion and they cling to an icon, which is why I put the Virgin Mary.

“And at one point in our life there is this woman who is holding to the raft because she does not believe in anything in the world anymore. Maybe she has disappointment with kids, maybe religion but she is just holding to life without no faith at all. And then all of a sudden you have the smallest one (woman), she’s holding to nothing. It’s wisdom at that point.”

Bordes said every single piece she carves has a story. She described the feelings she had while carving “The Beggar.”

“In 2010 when my country went through that earthquake, I realized from day one to day two that a lot of people become beggar, so I started with that idea and what it did to me deeply to understand what beggar is, is the conversation I had with her (The Beggar),” Bordes said. “I tried to see the humiliation but I also try to see the hope.”

Bordes said she always uses woman as her subjects in her art work because woman are the “seed keepers and they direct the world.

The Coleman Theater hosted Bordes’ last viewing on Thursday but her sculptors can be seen on her website at https://marikasculptures.com/

Coleman Theatre Marquee

Coleman Theatre Marquee