Mandela-Nelle: Interview and Article

 

Mandela-Nelle interview by Darren Dunn KWED https://marikaarts.files.wordpress.com/2014/12/interview-kwed-12-01-14-12314-7-29-pm.mp3

Mandela-Nelle Bronze

Mandela-Nelle
Bronze

Article from Seguin Today by Cindy Aguirre-Herrera on 12/02/2014 

National attention drawn to work of local artist; Local sculpture receives award in national fine art exhibition

(Seguin) — A local artist has been recognized by one of the most prestigious groups in the nation. Sculptor Marika Bordes was named the recipient of the “Claude Parsons Memorial Award.”

The award was presented by the American Artists Professional League (AAPL) during its 86th Grand National Exhibition. The presentation was made by AAPL President Peter Rossi during the group’s annual meeting and awards reception held at the Salmagundi Club in New York City.

Each year, the non-profit AAPL accepts a number of fine arts for consideration. The application alone, however, is competitive in that not everyone is allowed to participate in the contest.

Bordes, who received the award for her bronze sculpture entitled, “Mandela-Nelle” says she is appreciative to have been extended an award especially since this was her first attempt to enter the contest.

“The American Artist Professional League and the Salmagundi Club are two prestigious organizations and it is difficult to have your art accepted by the American Artist Professional League and have it exhibited at the Salmagundi Club. I was very excited to learn that Mandela-Nelle was accepted into the 86th Grand National Exhibition. I don’t know how many artists submitted applications but entries were from all 50 states as well as internationally,” said Bordes.

Each year, the organization hosts its Grand National Exhibition, a show that highlights major and emerging professional artists in oil, watercolor, pastel, sculpture, graphics and mixed media.

Bordes says on top of the national recognition, she is honored to have had her artwork exhibited in the show. She says only 29 sculptures were selected.

“It’s a woman. It’s kind of a girl and it’s an African American and she’s standing kind of walking very proud. She has a lot of pride in herself. That’s how I was picturing her when I was working on the piece,” said Bordes.

Bordes says the accomplishment is indeed one of her finest moments professionally.

“It is truly an honor to receive the Claude Parson’s memorial award particularly because of the professional stature of the judges. Along with the award certificate, the organizations sent an award plaque to affix to the base of the sculpture and a press release announcing that a Seguin artist from Texas is the recipient of the 2014 award and I think this is awesome and it filled me with joy,” said Bordes.

This year, the group highlights the achievements of 298 artists. The AAPL has devoted itself to the cause of fine arts in America since 1928.

 

KLRN Interviews Marika

The KLRN Program Arts Interviews Marika about her exhibition, “Only from the Heart…” at Bihl Haus Arts

Producer/Videographer/Editor – Leigh Utecht

Duration of video 4:26 minutes

Bihl Haus Gallery Hours

Friday and Saturday, 1:00 – 4:00 pm or

By appointment, 210-383.9723

Exhibition Closing Date

Saturday, July 12

Location

2803 Fredericksburg Road

(inside the gates of Primrose at Monitcello Park Senior Apartments)

San Antonio, TX

Off the Beaten Path

The Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority of Texas 2011 Annual Report presents profiles of eight individuals in its ten-county district.  Barbara Elmore wrote about Marika who represents Guadalupe County.  Connie Rothe designed the annual report.

 

Texas Lutheran University Journalism Students

Recently, Texas Lutheran University journalism students and Associate Professor Robin Bisha visited Marka’s studio.  The class was on a mission to interview and write an article about Marika and her art.  Thank you for the five beautiful and well-written articles.  Please enjoy the photographs of the visit and the writings of Sunny Valencia, Laura Torres, Samantha Kuykendall, Amber Gold, and Joy Fennigkoh.

Sunny Valencia

“Beauty is in the eye of the beholder”

SEGUIN – Oct. 19, Marika Bordes, noted sculptor, shared her creative proficiency with TLU students to experience her art from within the creative walls of her studio and encouraged them with her words of wisdom and passion towards her craft.

“Life gives a lot of lessons; these are the stories I’m here to tell. I tell them without words. I tell them in a language that is universal,” she said in her Seguin home studio. “Mallet and chisel, they talk for me. I tell my story.”

This humble artist, a Haiti native, was a late bloomer when it came to sculpture but is now continuing to draw attention for her smooth and elegant pieces of art that range in woods, colors, and sizes. She mostly creates art in female figures that correspond and inspire the essence of their power, beauty, and charm.

The TLU students who had the privilege to enter place of work, look around, take in her efforts, and have “hands on” experience gained an understanding deeper than those guests that go to the exhibits where her pieces are showcased.

“To touch them, feel them,” Bordes said. “Ask any question, a unique experience to come to an artist studio, not a museum, not the same contact.”

Instead of possibly picking her favorite work, she responded with having respect for two pieces, “Head of a Woman” and “Carousel of Women’s life.”  Her pieces are her way of expressing poetry. The latter piece is her “truth” of the female life, from childhood, to teenager, to motherhood, to the end of their time. It is how women have struggled to survive and motivate humanity.

Bordes shared her emotional story of her country and its effects on her craftsmanship.

“Haiti is a great source of information, great source of inspiration. If you can’t get inspired in Haiti, something is wrong with you,” she said as she made the students laugh. “I am proud to come from that country although it is the poorest country in the hemisphere. It is such a rich country.”  Her expression and intensity when she spoke let it be known that she was sincere with every word.

Wood called to her, she didn’t go to find it. Even at the age of 49, she gained her inspiration to become an artist. Now, 15 years later, she continues. “As long as I can do it, I will,” she said.

Bordes has a God given talent to create poetry and express multiple feelings from blocks and branches of wood. Her pieces tell the story she feels, but do not restrict the observer to that idea.

“It no longer belongs to me, it belongs to you,” Bordes said. “Make your own journey. They’re a gift, and you react the way you want to.”

By Laura Torres

There is a secret hidden along an herb garden in a quiet nook on Erkel Street. A shaky path of cement blocks line the way to a center-stage show staring passionate figures spawned from wood and inspired by stories.

Above an entrance reads a sign that reads, “Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.” This sign christens the site of where the artist Marika Bordes creates poetry with her mallet and chisel.

Bordes moved to Seguin in 2005 but has been sculpting since 1996. A native of Haiti, she is recognized throughout the art community for her style of elongated lines within her sculptures that represent female strength and tenderness.

Numerous awards dot her resume including fourth place in 2002 and 2003 at the artist exhibition, Rencontre des Arts, held near Montreal, Canada. She won first in 2003 from The Pen and Brush, an organization founded 110 years ago for female artists. This yearly sculpture contest exhibits 750 sculptures created by numerous professionals. In 2008, her sculpture “Nesting” won second prize at The Hill Country Arts Foundation 2008 National Juried Exhibition in Ingram.

While her studio is small it is also packed with passion. The studio is aglow with the tanned reflection of the wood sculptures that literally reach out to those who pass by. A dry smell of grated wood hangs in the air as the stories behind the sculpture come to light. A mother holds her daughter who, Bordes said, is like her but also is not. Her hair is unlike hers despite them both being of the same branch symbolizing how one cannot give what they have not received.

Another work is of Mary with her mother telling her that she is pregnant with the messiah. At the time being with a child out of wedlock was a social wrong. As Mary cradles her son inside her she is held by a mother who raises one hand in anguish but rests the other on her daughter in acceptance.

“Cry of Liberty” is Bordes’s newest sculpture and is of a woman whose face is in a screaming rage. Her hair seems to be pulled back by a fierce wind and at the tips unites to form a drum. Within the hair, a girl emerges from the strands. This piece is symbolic of women lifting the holds that bind so that their future daughters can be free. Each voice is like a beat on the drum within the hearts of women that becomes part of the song for freedom.

Some inspiration for Bordes’s carvings is drawn from the generosity, strength and elegance she has seen in her home of Haiti and in America. She credits her skills to her teacher and to the people of her country, who taught her simplicity.

“In Haiti it is poor but also so rich,” Bordes said. “I learned poetry through the people who do not know how to write or read.”

Haiti was where Bordes met master in find wood sculpting Francois Sanon. She had commissioned him to sculpt a piece for her that she routinely checked in on to monitor his work. The comments Bordes would give to Sanon about the piece made him feel that she was one who had the skill to carve. She dismissed his persistence since she shaid she couldn’t even sketch a line on a piece of paper, let alone carve. Eventually she was drawn to the craft.

“Life gives a lot of lessons that I tell without words in a unusual language of mallet and chisel,” Bordes said. “I put more than just a story. I put myself.”

To prepare she bought her own tools and proceeded to his study ready to sculpt. Sanon then asked her if she had $50 to which she gave him. A few days later he returned and gave her a chisel, larger than her own hands, made from the metal of an old car. Her wood was to be her mallet. He then told her it was all about her own style despite the many sculptors within the field. Bordes was on her way to an epiphany.

“He opened my eyes,” Bordes said. “Everything I could see, I could do it.”

Since then Bordes has created numerous pieces exhibiting a nurturing spirit. On Nov. 11, Bordes will display “Cry of Liberty” at An Auspicious Date at Gallery Nord in San Antonio. It has been coined by the galley as an international show since it features the work of 16 female artists from throughout the globe.

There is no time frame for when Bordes completes her sculptures since she may begin one, leave it to work on another sculpture, and return months or years later to complete it. Her current piece she is working on is that of an owl that will be placed in one of Seguin’s local parks.

Bordes’s studio is surrounded with the metamorphosis of her works. Across from the backyard where the wood in which her work is drawn from, rests the workshop where her tools wait. After a finishing simmer of polish is added, the pieces are taken steps away to rest in the gallery to call to a new home.

Her work builds on the thoughts of the viewer and is designed to rouse the minds of their owners who hear a call to them from the wood.

“I can inspire and give my own inspirations,” Bordes said. “When a sculpture is out of my hands it belongs to you. You bring or leave your story but I offer it.”

By Samantha Kuykendall

Many people believe once you are a certain age you are unable to learn new things or try things you had never tried before. Marika Bordes and her remarkable story help show people everywhere that anything is possible.

Bordes, 64, is originally from Haiti, and at the age of 49 she became a sculptor. She uses wood for all of her pieces. “I didn’t choose wood, wood chose me,” she said. She chose to sculpt with wood instead of any other material.

All of her pieces teach a lesson, she said, “Life is a lot of lessons and those are the stories I’m here to tell.” As many artist tend to say, “My mallet and chisel talk for me,” and “In a piece I put more than a story, I put myself,” said Bordes.

She creates most of her pieces from large pieces of wood that fall from trees. “I have never seen an ugly wood,” she said.

The size of the sculpture and the kind of wood are big factors in how long the piece will take to complete. Smaller ones can take as little as a week, while larger sculptures or harder wood can take up to a couple of months.

When she first started getting into sculpting her teacher told her, “Everything you can see you can do.” And most importantly, “You’re going to do you’re own and that’s what’s important.”

Bordes states that sculpting is her way of “letting others see through the same glasses she sees through.”

“I would like to quilt and do so many other things,” but while I am still strong enough, I will continue to sculpt, said Bordes.

Bordes has an exibit coming up Nov. 11 in San Antonio. For more information you can check her blog.  Bordes said, “I’m looking forward to what they say, and what they say I should do better.”

By Amber Gold

Oct. 19 (Seguin) – Have you ever wondered what goes through an artist’s mind when they create a piece of artwork?

Marika Bordes, a native from Haiti, presented several journalism students with the opportunity to visit her studio to experience the essence of her sculptures.

Ironically, Bordes was first introduced into sculpting after an encounter she had with a sculptor from her country by the name of Sanon. She initially commissioned him to create a piece of work for her and began to give him feedback throughout the process. Sanon recognized the potential that Marika possessed and he told her that she could carve and he would teach her.

Initially a little uncertain, Bordes took up sculpting a couple years later and said she “learned it and loved it.” She recalls her master telling her, “You won’t do it like other artists, but you’ll do your own.” With this newfound sense of self and six tools she had acquired from Montreal, Bordes began to create her first wood masterpiece that depicted a woman from her native country.

Many of her art pieces such as the “Cry of Liberty,” “Seas of Uncertainty,” and “Carousel of Women’s Lives” reflect the struggles and encounters that the people of Haiti face today. These obstacles serve as a source of inspiration for Bordes as she reflects on her culture. “Through Haiti, I have learned the simplicity of life,” states Bordes. This reflection on her culture enables her to share the journey of life through conflict, pain, and triumph with her public audience.

Bordes signifies her purpose as an artist as she states “Life gives lots of lessons and those are the stories I’m here to tell, I tell them without words in a language that is universal.”

From her sculptures, Bordes hopes that people will one day see their own personal stories and experiences. The inspiration expressed through the artwork is something that she hopes will manifest in the lives of future generations as they triumph over life’s battles.

Poetry through a Mallet and Chisel

By Joy Fennigkoh

October 19, 2011—Marika Bordes, master wood sculptor, allowed the Texas Lutheran University (TLU) journalism students to visit her home studio and hear her and her sculptures that she describes as, “poetry.”

When walking into Bordes’s studio the beautiful wood sculptures shine with unique character and design. Each finished sculpture is carved with detail and noticeable care and each tell a different story of their own to those who view them.

“I haven’t met an ugly wood—it’s all in their grain, beauty and character,” Bordes said.

Bordes mostly works with hard woods because of the beautiful results that she gets after carving it regardless of the challenge it poses. As a result of her hard work, her finished sculptures stand strong and beautiful telling their unique stories.

One piece that Bordes has recently completed is called the “Cry of Liberty.” This piece is a sculpture of a woman’s head whose face is shouting while her daughter is calm coming from her hair beside her. In the back of the sculpture is a little drum.

“The woman is tracing the path for the future (the daughter)—The drum is the call deep inside.” Bordes said. “It is what is not right, calling for action,” Bordes said while tapping on the drum.

The “Cry of Liberty” was first representing speaking out about slavery, but is a timeless piece that changes meaning with the world around it and also with those who view it.

Bordes wants those who see her work to reflect on what they know and to see the sculptures. She also wants her audience to understand that it is never too late to do something new or pursue something you love.

“We are called humanity, and humanity is beautiful—life is nothing but a gift,” Bordes says.

Exhibit draws crowds

Seeing Gwaihir for the First Time

By Bob Thaxton

The Seguin Gazette-Enterprise

 

Published October 19, 2010

SEGUIN — A crowd estimated at 400 to 450 people turned out Saturday evening for the opening of “Visions of Wood” at the Heritage Museum in downtown Seguin.

The exhibit features wood sculptures done by local artist Marika Bordes and her students. “Visions in Wood” will continue through the end of the year at the Heritage Museum which is open from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday-Friday at the corner of River and Gonzales streets.

The exhibit is dominated by “Gwaihir: The Lord of Eagles, Master of Wind” which stands more than 15 feet tall and stretches up through a stairwell into the second floor of the museum.

“Gwaihir is here because of the generosity of a good friend,” Bordes said, referring to John Schwartz whose chinaberry tree became the raw material for the superhuman-sized sculpture.

During a visit to the Schwartz ranch, she saw a big tree that had fallen to the ground.

“I looked at it, and I thought it was interesting,” Bordes said.

She had done a sculpture of chinaberry wood commissioned for the Schwartzes 50th anniversary, and John urged her to go to work on the fallen tree.

“It challenged me,” Bordes said. Some nine or 10 months ago, she began working on the tree.

“He gave me space at his ranch,” she said. “That’s when I started working on it.”

At first, she worked on the tree where it had fallen. Schwartz had fenced in the area to keep the cattle away from it, and he later moved the piece into a barn on his property.

“He’s been very kind with us,” Bordes said.

As the work progressed, she brought out some of her students to help sand the wood.

When asked why she wanted them to participate, Bordes told of her sculpture teacher having her assist on a large project.

“I don’t want you to be afraid of any big project,” she said her teacher told her.

Bordes was amazed at the turnout Saturday. “I thought it was wonderful. I was not expecting all that,” she said Monday.

She noted that those attending included people from San Antonio, Austin, Kerrville, Blanco and elsewhere.

“For once, they can see what is happening in Seguin, what is happening in my studio,” Bordes said. “What I really wanted to show was the talent there is in Seguin. There is a lot of potential here.”

 

Seguin Artist Selected for Prestigious Texas Tour

Seguin Daily News

Tuesday, July 20, 2010

The art pieces, as well as the skills and talents used in creating these fine wood sculptures, will soon be available to all Texans. Artist Marika Bordes, of Seguin, has been selected to participate in the prestigious 2010-2011 Texas Touring Roster of the Texas Commission on the Arts. Bordes is one of only a handful of Texas artists who have been selected for the opportunity.

By Cindy Aguirre-Herrera

(Seguin) — Local Sculptor Marika Bordes is taking her art on the road. Bordes, a member of the Seguin Oakwood Art League and the Texas Society of Sculptors ,has been selected by the Texas Commission on the Arts to participate in its 2010-2011 Texas Touring Roster. Bordes is one of only 124 individuals and companies to receive the grant award.

By being chosen for the touring roster, the wood carving sculptor will receive the opportunity to offer presentations, demonstrations and workshops to adults and youth. Through these presentations, Bordes says she hopes to inspire people to appreciate the importance of art.

“It’s a great honor, although we applied for it, but after that when I knew about the process (and of ) getting in, I feel very blessed and honored to be with such a group of people. I do think by going all over to show people what we can do with wood, I will pass on the legacy that I received from my people to other people that will continue it,” said Bordes.

The state of Texas designed the Touring Arts Program to ensure that all Texans have the ability to enjoy performances and presentations in their own communities by what they call ‘outstanding Texas-based artists’.

“Artists on the Texas Touring Roster travel to communities across the state and perform in a variety of venues,” said Gary Gibbs, TCA executive director. “In addition to performances, they may also conduct workshops, master classes, residences, lecture-demonstrations or arts education components as a way to engage community residents. We are proud to offer the citizens of Texas access to such high-quality artistic talent.”

Gaye McElwain, director marketing and communications for the Texas Commission on the Arts, says Seguin should be proud of Bordes’ accomplishments thus far. She says selection for the touring list is limited to the elite and most creative artists and performance companies around.

“It is prestigious in the sense that those artists are going to be looked at by Texas presenters state wide to be brought into their communities to do workshops and exhibitions and performances — things of that type. So we at the Commission on the Arts want to make sure that the list that we are providing are all the highest quality, people who are good not only in terms of artistic product but that are also going to be a good addition to their community in terms of the way they can communicate about their artwork maybe do some educational outreach — things of that type,” said McElwain.

The Texas Commission on the Arts does not provide funds to artists in the Texas Touring Roster. Instead, TCA provides grants to arts presenters, schools, libraries, theatres and other non profits throughout Texas to help with the cost of bringing in companies and artists from the roster.

Bordes says what is particularly exciting for her is the opportunity to spread the word about Seguin as an arts destination.

“Here in Seguin we have so many talents and I’m experiencing it everyday. Actually, I have nine students, and we are going to have that exhibition in October. You are all going to see

how it is. The variety of talents and thought and creativity — I think we need people to know who we are in Seguin, and I don’t mean that I’m the best ambassador for it, but I will do my best to let people know who we are in Seguin and what we can do,” said Bordes.

Artists on this year’s Texas Touring Roster range from individual performing and visual artist to large performing arts companies.

Artistic disciplines include music, visual art, dance, theatre, storytelling, literary art and folk art.